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NSSLGlobal, a satcoms company in the cleantech portfolio of Arendals Fossekompani the Norwegian investment house, has partnered with shipowner SOIC Ship Management AB to install the technology onboard the ship.

The Götheborg of Sweden was an advanced merchant sailing ship in the 1700s. It was rebuilt as a full 1:1 scale model of the original Swedish East India Company vessel which sank outside of Gothenburg in 1745.

The vessel has just embarked on a historic two-year journey around Europe to Asia completing its voyage in late 2023. To help it on its journey and with the help of partners such as NSSLGlobal, the vessel has been equipped with the latest 21st century communication and navigation technology in order to ensure the safety and comfort of the crew on their long voyage.

The ship will act as the trade and maritime ambassador for Sweden and is a platform for its partners to focus attention on the greatest challenge of our times – the adaptation to a sustainable future.

As well as keeping its crew safe and entertained throughout the 18-month journey, the vessel will be using NSSLGlobal’s communication network to feed back its daily position, check weather reports as well as upload the latest photos, videos and news. With around 600 sensors aboard the Götheborg, the technical staff on board and on shore can use NSSLGlobal’s VSATIP@SEA to monitor critical operational systems including temperature, pressure, fuel, and water levels.

“Although the Götheborg resembles a vessel from the 1700s, it’s essential we have the latest vessel communications technology on board to ensure the safety of our professional crew. We’re grateful to NSSLGlobal for providing their world-class satellite technology and airtime on this landmark journey around the world,” Lars Ringnér, Ship Director of SOIC Ship Management, commented.

“Additionally, this relationship is complemented by both companies’ commitment to working sustainably and we will be sailing under wind power as much as possible.”

Source: offshore-energy.biz